November 22, 2017

23/11/2017: Secretary Perdue announces Soybean Board appointments

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced the appointment of 19 members and three alternate members to serve on the United Soybean Board  

The producers appointed to serve three year terms include:
• Annie Dee, Aliceville, Ala.
• Robert Stobaugh, Atkins, Ark.
• Gary Berg, Saint Elmo, Ill.
• Tom Griffiths, Kendallville, Ind.
• Thomas E. Oswald, Cleghorn, Iowa
• Larry K. Marek, Riverside, Iowa
• Dennis Gruenbacher, Andale, Kan.
• Keith N. Tapp, Sebree, Ky.
• Belinda Burrier, Union Bridge, Md.
• Herb Miller, Niles, Mich.
• Lawrence Sukalski, Fairmont, Minn.
• Philip Good, Macon, Miss.
• Lewis Rone, Pontageville, Mo.
• Mike Korth, Randolph, Neb.
• Dave Dotterer, Rittman, Ohio
• Ellie W. Green, Jr., Lynchburg, S.C.
• Marc V. Reiner, Tripp, S.D.
• David Nichols, Ridgely, Tenn.
• Andrew W. Scott, Jr., Monte Alto, Texas
• Colt Clemmons, Killen, Ala. Alternate
• Fitzhugh Bethea, Dillon, S.C. Alternate
• Daniel C. Berglund, Wharton, Texas Alternate

"I truly appreciate the time and expertise that these individuals have agreed to provide, and know U.S. soybean producers will be well served by these men and women,” said Perdue.

The board is composed of 73 members representing 29 states and Eastern and Western regions. To become a member, you must be a soybean producer and be nominated by a qualified state soybean board.

The board is authorised by the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Information Act. It became effective July 9, 1991, when the Soybean Promotion and Research Order was implemented.

Since 1966, Congress has authorised the establishment of 22 industry-funded research and promotion boards. They empower farmers and ranchers to leverage their own resources to develop new markets, strengthen existing markets, and conduct important research and promotion activities.

USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service provides oversight, paid for by industry assessments, which ensures fiscal accountability and program integrity for participating stakeholders.

A list of United Soybean Board members and more information about research and promotion programs is available on the Soybean Research and Promotion Program page on the AMS website, HERE.

Visit the United Soybean Board’s website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/11/2017: AfDB boosts African Agriculture and nutrition with US$ 10 million equity investment in Phatisa Food Fund

The Board of Directors of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB) today approved US$10 million equity investment in Phatisa Food Fund2 (PFF2) to boost agriculture and nutrition across Africa

PFF2 is a second generation fund which builds on the success of its predecessor African Agriculture Fund (AAF), sponsored by AfDB along with other DFIs including the French Development Agency (AFD), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation and Development (AECID).
 

Image credit: Hernán Piñera on Flickr
(CC BY-SA 2.0)

Phatisa, PFF2s fund manager, is a South-Africa based private-equity, corporate finance and advisory company operating across Africa, incorporated in January 2008 as a limited company in Mauritius. “Phatisa” is Xhosa word for “helping to carry.”

PFF2 is targeting a capitalization of US$ 300 million to invest across Africa with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. It is projected to cover the entire African continent, with a sharper focus on Sub-Saharan Africa, relying on its presence in South Africa, Kenya, and Zambia, Mauritius and London and a new office opening in Côte d’Ivoire.

Presently, the Fund targets average investment amounts of US$ 20 million in Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria in West Africa; Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in East Africa and Mozambique, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe in southern Africa.

PFF2 will focus on food/consumer related investments including integrated food production, processing, services and inputs (seed, fertiliser & chemicals), mechanisation, distribution, logistics and infrastructure, packaging, food services and retail.

Considering the largely underserved needs of agricultural financing in Africa, the Fund’s investment policy entails that the deployment of equity or quasi equity instruments to provide expansion capital in the majority of the cases. PPF2’s investment strategy is aligned with the Bank’s High5 priorities of feeding and industrialising Africa.

It is in line with the Bank’s Ten Year Strategy, focusing on inclusive growth, strengthening agriculture and food security, and access to local finance, among other Bank strategies as well as government agriculture and agro-industry policies across African countries.


Visit the AfDB website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/11/2017: Selecting the right NSP-enzymes to reduce poultry feed costs

by Dr Hans Christoph Wagner - AVEVE Biochem

The anti-nutritive activities of soluble and insoluble Non-Starch-Polysaccharides (NSP-fibre) are eliminated effectively by supplementation of NSP-multi-enzymes into pig and poultry feed


Firstly, such biological active substances cause a partial degradation of NSP-fibre to smaller molecules hence to reduce highly viscous ingesta.

Secondly, impenetrable cellulosic barriers caused by insoluble NSP-fibre are greatly removed. 
 
Image credit: Steven Lilley on Flickr
(CC BY-SA 2.0)

Furthermore enzyme linked feed energy upgrading systems enable nutritionists to precisely recalculate feed formulations on nutrient values and reduced formulation costs.

The following article will lead through the specific NSPs subject transmitting practical feed formulation tools to reduce feed costs.

Analysing substrate fingerprints to fulfill enzyme lock-key model principles

Feed ingredients consist of non-starch-polysaccharides (NSP) and specified NSP-fibre substrates if observed in context of enzyme physiology. NSP-fibre substrates refer to the largest heterogenic variety of polysaccharide molecules in nature and as mono-gastric animals do not synthesise and release any corresponding digestive enzyme, NSP-fibre substrates are practically indigestible.

In contradiction the chemically α-linked polysaccharide molecules of starch substrates are highly digestible and can be depolymerised by body’s own synthesised amylases enzymes. NSP-enzymes exhibit a high specificity for the corresponding NSP-fibre substrate, hence each enzyme only breaks down a highly specific NSP-fibre substrate.

As NSP-fibre substrates of different feed ingredients consist of various NSP-fibre types their typical NSP- molecule fingerprint, so called – the lock - has to be determined to develop the appropriated NSP-enzyme composition – the key.

The lock-key-principle is the commonly used term to prescribe this unique one-to-one relation. As the efficiency of multi-enzymes is linked to fine-tuned compositions and ratios of different NSP-enzymes, research on complexity of molecule determination of NSP-fibre substrates and a better understanding of NSP-enzymes implied in NSP-fibre degradation is an ongoing and one of the most targeted research focuses in feed additive business.

Categorising negative NSP-fibre effects in layer feed ingredients

The negative effects of NSP-fibre play a crucial role in the digestion process of pig and poultry, might lead to digestive limitations in the gut system and thus have to be considered in developing feed formulations. These negative effects can be categorised into two groups.

Firstly, NSP-fibre can increase the viscosity in the intestine by their high water binding capacity. As a consequence increased viscosity slows down the migration and absorption of nutrients, lowers the feed intake and reduces the access of digestive enzymes synthesised and released by the animal itself.

The commonly used synonym to prescribe this phenomenon is the “Gel effect”. Secondly, insoluble NSP-fibre can encapsulate feed nutrients which become less accessible for digestion and absorption in the relatively small intestine.

These nutrients enter undigested the large intestine where they become a substrate for unintended bacterial fermentation. The commonly used synonym to prescribe this phenomenon is the “Nut shell effect”.

Digesting NSP-fibre of feed ingredients by cutting the glycosidical bonds of polysaccharide molecules and taking advantage of nutrients encapsulated by NSP-fibre, the use of a substrate adapted NSP-multi-enzyme in feed is the only available but also most effective choice.


Read the full article, HERE.

Visit the AVEVE Biochem website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Van Aarsen company profile




Van Aarsen has become a household name worldwide for machinery and turnkey projects for animal feed technology, both for commercial feed producers and for vertically-integrated businesses. 

Quality is of the utmost importance in both sectors of the industry and innovations in feed production are therefore of great interest. 

Thanks to their extensive experience, engineers and technicians are always able to offer tailor-made solutions.

Visit the company website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com
TEXT 

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com


Join us in Bangkok, Thailand on 27th March for a full day of informative and innovative presentations from the milling industry’s best and brightest! 


  A ONE-DAY CONFERENCE FOR MILLERS OF 
FOOD, FLOUR & RICE



Session A

Flour Milling - Processing, Quality, Storage & Transportation

Session B
Rice Milling - Processing and Handiling

Session C
Rice Milling Innovation - Technology & Development





Program of Conference will be available soon

November 21, 2017

22/11/2017: Purdue poised to improve sorghum for millions with $5 million grant

Purdue University scientists will develop stronger, more versatile varieties of sorghum that have the potential to reach millions of African farmers, thanks to a $5 million, five-year grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

The foundation’s grant is the second for Gebisa Ejeta, a distinguished professor in the Department of Agronomy and director of the Purdue Centre for Global Food Security.

Ejeta, the 2009 World Food Prize laureate, was recognised for his work in developing and distributing high-yielding varieties of sorghum that are also drought-tolerant and resistant to striga, a parasitic weed that robs maize, sorghum, rice, pearl millet and sugarcane of necessary nutrients.
 

Gebisa Ejeta
Image credit: Purdue University

Striga can devastate a crop and impacts more than 100 million people in Africa. Over the last four years, Prof. Ejeta, along with his students and research collaborators, uncovered the basic genetic and biological processes that control striga resistance in sorghum.

They identified a gene involved with the release of a chemical from sorghum roots that signals striga seed to germinate and attach to those roots. That has led to the creation of new sorghum varieties that combine striga- and drought-resistance more readily using molecular technology.

So far, 961 tons of seed have been distributed to more than 400,000 farmers in Ethiopia and Tanzania.

“With more high-throughput phenotyping and the ability to sequence a large slate of genotypes, we identified an important gene that is foundational for imparting striga resistance,” Prof. Ejeta said.

“It helps to move that gene with confidence and consider new ways of exploiting that gene. Some of that we’ve already been working on.”

This next phase of the program will focus on advancements in biological research, specifically identifying more genes involved in imparting broad-based and durable striga resistance in sorghum and other crops.

“We would have multiple genes that we can move around and pyramid together, so there is no risk of one gene breaking down in the future,” Prof. Ejeta said.

The new project will expand to support researchers in Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Niger, Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Mali to develop a breeding pipeline for more high-yielding, nutritious, disease-resistant and drought-tolerant varieties of crops.

The project plans to support private seed systems that will distribute high-quality hybrid sorghum seeds more effectively in those countries.

“This creates opportunities for farmers and small businesses to engage in gainful employment and develop the agricultural industry in these countries,” Prof. Ejeta said.

For more information visit the Purdue University website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

22/11/2017: Impact of dietary potassium diformate on swine performance is backed by analysis of worldwide data sets

by Christian Lückstädt, ADDCON, Germany

Sustaining growth rate and optimal feed efficiency in pigs is key to their economic performance through to market


With mounting pressure on the costs of pig production in general worldwide, nutrition is increasingly under scrutiny. Compound feed is not only an effective way of delivering nutrients to animals, but it has long been utilised as a delivery strategy for non-nutritive additives used to promote health. 


 
Image credit: Dan Belanescu on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)
For decades the industry relied heavily on antibiotics as growth promoters in feed, until it became clear that the development of bacterial resistance against these compounds could jeopardise their future in the fight against bacterial disease, not only in animals, but also in human health care.

The search for alternatives became critical around 15 years ago, beginning in Europe, but more recently in Asia, including India, Indonesia or Vietnam.

It is generally agreed that good gut health is effective against intestinal pathogens, a strategy that has only become evident through the removal of antibiotic growth promoters in feed. Creating and maintaining a healthy intestinal environment has become essential to productivity and food safety programmes alike.

Maintaining a healthy gut requires up to 25 percent of the daily protein and 20 percent of the dietary energy supplied with the feed, so this strategy should be an integral component of the dietary program, to avoid wasting resources.

In many countries, the use of acidifiers in diets for pigs at all stages has already proved itself an effective tool for achieving and maintaining gut health, for instance through the efficient utilisation of dietary nutrients for productivity and health.

This has been demonstrated in university studies and under commercial conditions. Organic acids, their salts and mixtures of these are authorised for use as feed preservatives and as zoo technical feed additives, both in Europe and elsewhere.

Of the non-antibiotic growth promoters, organic acids are among the most reliable and can be used safely with other additives.

Papatsiros and Billinis (2012) reported “…Dietary acidifiers can actually become the most common and efficacious alternative solution to antibiotics, in order to improve health status and performance in pigs.”

The mode of action of organic acids and their salts has been described extensively in the literature (as summarised by Freitag, 2007; Metzler and Mosenthin, 2007). However, the magnitude of the effect on performance has not always been consistent. The reason for this is likely to lie in the variability of pig production conditions, including environmental factors, feed formulation and management.

While biosecurity and hygiene in the feed mill and on farm are essential, the acidification of feed ingredients or finished feeds with organic acids also offers considerable benefits in the control of pathogenic bacteria.

Feed acidification is not only effective within the feed, as reviewed by Stonerock (2007), its biggest benefit may occur within the pig itself – in achieving a healthy gut!


For references, tables, and to read the full article click, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com